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Subjects

Mathematics & Additional Mathematics

The syllabus is intended to provide students with fundamental mathematical knowledge and skills.

The general aims of the mathematics syllabuses are to enable students to:

  1. acquire the necessary mathematical concepts and skills for continuous learning in mathematics and related disciplines, and for applications to the real world
  2. develop the necessary process skills for the acquisition and application of mathematical concepts and skills
  3. develop the mathematical thinking and problem solving skills and apply these skills to formulate and solve problems
  4. recognise and use connections among mathematical ideas, and between mathematics and other disciplines
  5. develop positive attitudes towards mathematics
  6. make effective use of a variety of mathematical tools (including information and communication technology tools) in the learning and application of mathematics
  7. produce imaginative and creative work arising from mathematical ideas
  8. develop the abilities to reason logically, to communicate mathematically, and to learn cooperatively and independently

Pedagogies & Modes of Instruction
Three pedagogical approaches form the spine that supports our modes of instruction in the classroom. They are not mutually exclusive and can be used in different parts of a lesson or unit. For example, the lesson or unit could start with an activity, followed by teacher-led inquiry and end with direct instruction.

Activity-based Learning
This approach is about learning through application. It is not only particularly effective for teaching mathematical concepts and skills at primary and lower secondary levels, but also effective at higher levels. Students engage in activities to explore and learn mathematical concepts and skills, both individually and in groups. They could use manipulatives or other resources to construct meanings and deepen their understanding of mathematical concepts. Through concrete manipulatives and experiences, students are guided to uncover abstract mathematical concepts or results.

Teacher-directed Inquiry 
This approach is about learning through guided inquiry. Instead of giving the answers, teachers lead students to explore, investigate and find answers on their own. Students learn to focus on specific questions and ideas and are engaged in communicating, explaining and reflecting on their answers. They also learn to pose questions, process information and data and seek appropriate methods and solutions. This enhances the development of mathematical processes and 21st century competencies.

Direct Instruction
This approach is about explicit teaching. Teachers introduce, explain and demonstrate new concepts and skills. Direct instruction is most effective when students are told what they will be learning and what they are expected to be able to do. This helps them to focus on the learning goals. Teachers draw connections, pose questions, emphasise key concepts, and role-model the thinking processes. Holding students’ attention is critical. Stimuli such as videos, images, real case scenarios, and even humour aid in sustaining students’ attention during lessons.

Key Programmes & Activities
  • Singapore Mathematical Olympiad
  • University of New South Wales Mathematics Competition
  • All Singapore Schools Mathematics Competition for Normal Course Students
  • Independent Learning of Mathematics through E-Learning Portal
  • Primary School Mathematics Peer Tutoring
  • Mathematics Corridor (Learning Beyond Syllabus)
  • NT Mathematics Trail
  • Project Work
  • Mathematical Modelling Tasks

Principles of Accounts (POA)

The syllabus aims to develop an understanding of the principles and concepts of accounting and their applications in a variety of business situations. Candidates will acquire basic knowledge in double entry and develop the ability to prepare, present, analyse and interpret financial statements.

The syllabus is organised into six sections:
  1. role of accounting which is to provide information for monitoring and decision making by different users
  2. double entry system of book-keeping which comprises the accounting equation, source documents, books of prime entry, the cash book, the general journal, the ledger and the trial balance
  3. accounting procedures regarding capital and revenue expenditure, depreciation, adjustments to ledger accounts, the correction of errors and control accounts
  4. fundamentals of preparing the final accounts i.e. Trading Account, Profit and Loss Account, Balance Sheet and the operation of partnerships
  5. preparation of final accounts for sole traders and partnerships, including the use of incomplete records
  6. analysis and interpretation of final accounts involving ratios

Pedagogies & Modes of Instruction
Three pedagogical approaches form the spine that supports our modes of instruction in the classroom. They are not mutually exclusive and can be used in different parts of a lesson or unit. For example, the lesson or unit could start with an activity, followed by teacher-led inquiry and end with direct instruction.

Activity-based Learning
This approach is about learning through application. It is not only particularly effective for teaching mathematical concepts and skills at primary and lower secondary levels, but also effective at higher levels. Students engage in activities to explore and learn mathematical concepts and skills, both individually and in groups. They could use manipulatives or other resources to construct meanings and deepen their understanding of mathematical concepts. Through concrete manipulatives and experiences, students are guided to uncover abstract mathematical concepts or results.

Teacher-directed Inquiry
This approach is about learning through guided inquiry. Instead of giving the answers, teachers lead students to explore, investigate and find answers on their own. Students learn to focus on specific questions and ideas and are engaged in communicating, explaining and reflecting on their answers. They also learn to pose questions, process information and data and seek appropriate methods and solutions. This enhances the development of mathematical processes and 21st century competencies.

Direct Instruction 
This approach is about explicit teaching. Teachers introduce, explain and demonstrate new concepts and skills. Direct instruction is most effective when students are told what they will be learning and what they are expected to be able to do. This helps them to focus on the learning goals. Teachers draw connections, pose questions, emphasise key concepts, and role-model the thinking processes. Holding students’ attention is critical. Stimuli such as videos, images, real case scenarios, and even humour aid in sustaining students’ attention during lessons.

Key Programmes & Activities
  • POA Carnivals
  • NYP-ACCA Accounting Challenge
  • Ngee Ann Polytechnic Accounting Quiz
  • Singapore Polytechnic Accounting Challenge
  • Temasek Polytechnic POA Olympiad

Computer Applications (CPA)

Computer Applications (CPA)
The Computer Applications (CPA) syllabus aims to prepare our students to be technologically adept and effective citizens, and to function and contribute effectively in a technologically driven world.

The CPA syllabus emphasises on current technological developments and trends, and core computer skills. The syllabus is suitable for students who are mainly visual learners and best engaged through hands-on learning activities.

The syllabus provides room and opportunities for students to appreciate the applications of computer technology and use of various software application packages to perform meaningful tasks. It seeks to nurture students into effective and efficient end-users of computer technology, through the mastery of core skills and by building up their confidence to learn new skills.

The goal is that students will enjoy using and value computer technology as an important tool to meet their personal needs and the needs of society, while it becomes an integral part of their lives.

Pedagogies & Modes of Instruction
CPA is a skill-based subject with an emphasis on practical skills. Students are thus very much involved in practical work. For example, the core module on Computer Basics (COB) will require candidates to manage files and folders and the core module on Computers in Everyday Life (CEL) will involve the use of the Internet and related software applications.

Students may use any software application packages and hardware for the core and option modules. The features to be covered are generically described and can be found in most popular software application packages and hardware. The development of skill proficiency in the use of relevant software application packages and hardware is essential to the successful completion of a practical task or creation of a product for coursework. Teachers will provide students with the learning opportunities to develop a deep understanding of computer concepts and skills in the use of hardware and software.

Learning is focused on real-life scenarios, taking place in authentic situations and within students’ experiences. The learning stages will be paced and connected so that students can see meaning in what they are doing and the direction they are heading towards. When students are self-directed, they will also be motivated to complete their tasks to the best of their abilities. They will then see the relevance of the selected software application packages and hardware for practical tasks, coursework, and core and option modules.


Key Programmes & Activities
  • Annual MEC Competition
  • Teaching the animation software “Scratch” such that students learn to create interactive stories, games, music and art

Elements of Business Skills (EBS)

Elements of Business Skills (EBS)
The syllabus aims to equip students with the basic knowledge, skills and values relevant for the new developments in the services sector. The focus is on the development of a range of knowledge and core skills in business and enterprise with particular emphasis on retail, tourism, and hospitality industries.

In addition, the syllabus infuses economic and financial literacy in the general understanding of the business environment and for personal effectiveness. The syllabus also provides opportunities for students to develop social-emotional competencies in social awareness, relationship management and decision-making.

Pedagogies & Modes of Instruction
The constructivist and direct instruction approaches are commonly used for the teaching and learning of EBS.

Constructivist Approach
The constructivist approach to learning is an approach where teachers double up as facilitators and take students through experiential learning. Various strategies are used to provide a stimulating environment for creating awareness and learning. The pedagogies include:
  • Role play
  • Using video clips as scenarios
  • Cooperative learning strategies
  • Learning Journeys
  • Amazing Race, games, quizzes
  • ICT-infused games, online quizzes, self-directed learning

Direct Instruction
This approach is about explicit teaching. Teachers introduce, explain and demonstrate new concepts and skills. Direct instruction is most effective when students are told what they will be learning and what they are expected to be able to do. This helps them to focus on the learning goals. Teachers draw connections, pose questions, emphasise key concepts, and role-model the thinking processes. Holding students’ attention is critical. Stimuli such as videos, images, real case scenarios, and even humour aid in sustaining students’ attention during lessons.

Key Programmes & Activities
  • Entrepreneurship Challenge
  • Work Experience Programme(WEP) at Four Seasons Hotel during Singapore F1 Grand Prix